SHARE

Dear Sex Ed, I am a 34 year old, heterosexual male in a relationship with my girlfriend for 2 1/2 years. I’ve noticed lately that when I cum, hardly anything comes out anymore. Is there anything i can do about this?

Thanks, Drying Up in NYC.

Dear Drying Up,

Volume of ejaculate can be affected by various circumstances related to you or to the situation. Situational variables include how turned on you are by your partner, the “newness” of the encounter, or how much time is spent being aroused before orgasm. Volume and “vigor” of ejaculation can be affected by poor prostate health such as prostatitis, an inflammation of the gland which can be either very painful or asymptomatic. Testosterone levels have a big effect on the nature and sensation of orgasm in men and can be treated with prescription testosterone supplementation. Frequency of orgasms can also have an effect; the ideal interval between ejaculations to maximize sperm production is 3-5 days but waiting longer doesn’t necessarily mean more production and there can even be diminishing returns by waiting too long. Ejaculation can be significantly affected by drugs (prescription and recreational) and alcohol. Prescription medications that are associated with a negative effect on sex function include (but are not limited to) SSRIs (like Prozac, Zoloft, Lexapro, and others), opiate pain medications (Vicodin or Percocet), anti-histamines and decongestants (Benadryl, Sudafed), and Propecia. Recreational use of marijuana, alcohol, cocaine, or pretty much anything else can often have an effect in a bad way on both erections and orgasms. Sometimes medications like Cialis or Viagra can be of use by allowing a longer period of foreplay without fear of losing an erection.

If there is any concern about prostate health, negative effect of prescription medications, or to pursue the use of prescription medications, a visit with an internist or a urologist would be advised. Men often learn about sex through pornography and it is important to remember that actors in adult entertainment are not typically “average” when it comes to sexual function, so it’s a good idea not to compare yourself to what you see in the movies. The bottom line is that in order to maximize your semen volume you need to take your time during foreplay, consider changing things up with your partner to “spice it up” a bit, and take a break for a day or three between orgasms.

QUESTIONS ABOUT RELATIONSHIPS, SEX, OR JUST ABOUT ANYTHING ELSE CAN BE SUBMITTED TO SEX ED BELOW, OR VIA EMAIL TO doctoreddy@live.com

SHARE
Previous articleMy exclusive with Kristin Cavallari- Jewelry, shoes and more
Next articleCoachella 2013; What to Wear
Edward S. Goldberg, MD is a board-certified, Manhattan-based physician in private practice. He completed his training at the prestigious Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 1993 and has been seeing patients in his Upper East Side office since that time. Philosophically, Dr. Goldberg believes in a natural approach to health whenever possible, though he is well versed in, and has a respect for, pharmaceutical intervention when necessary. Although he is a physician, he will often describe himself as a student of the human condition, and with 20 years of experience in patient care, he has developed an understanding of the multiple varieties of lifestyles and behaviors, which can lead to both conflict as well as satisfaction, individually, as well as in relationships. In addition to treating and preventing disease, Dr. Goldberg is very interested in helping patients achieve the highest possible quality of life on every possible level. He has observed that a significant area of health education and information lacking in the U.S. healthcare system relates to sexual health. Dr. Goldberg has committed himself to allowing his patients to explore any and all questions relating to their sexual health as a part of his practice. Your inquiries regarding any and all questions relating to relationships or sexuality are welcome for his consideration.